UIE Newsletter: On Surveys

Jared Spool

September 2nd, 2015

In this week’s UIE newsletter, we reprint an article from Erika Hall. In it, she explores why quantifying customer results in a survey isn’t always beneficial to a company’s success.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

Surveys are the most dangerous research tool—misunderstood and misused. They frequently straddle the qualitative and quantitative, and at their worst represent the worst of both.

In tort law the attractive nuisance doctrine refers to a hazardous object likely to attract those who are unable to appreciate the risk posed by the object. In the world of design research, surveys can be just such a nuisance.

Read the article: On Surveys.

How does your company select its research methods? How could it improve its ability to measure success? Share your thoughts with us below.

Jenn Lukas – Developing a Living Style Guide with CSS

Sean Carmichael

September 1st, 2015

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[ Transcript Available ]

Jenn Lukas

The notion of being a “designer who can code” has been a prevalent topic in recent years. Delivering static PDFs and working in photoshop is seen as inefficient in some circles. Being able to create a clickable or even responsive mockup to present to developers and stakeholders can be a better way to show your intent. It’s also much easier to iterate by changing a few lines of code.

One of the greatest benefits of using CSS is speaking the same language as your developers. Jenn Lukas takes it a step further. She shares the example of using a unitless line-height. Instead of looking at it in terms of pixels or em values, view it as a multiplier. This allows you to keep a coherent size across multiple devices and screens. Having this common language aids in creating a more collaborative feel to conversations with developers versus dictating to them what to do.

Designers don’t even necessarily need to know the whole gamut of CSS in order to design this way. Being able to use just enough code to create an interface element that not only shows how it should look and work but actually displays it in action is a powerful communication tool. Additionally, you create this living style guide that more closely resembles what the actual finished product will look like and how it will behave.

Jenn will be presenting one of 8 daylong workshops at UI20 November 2-4 in Boston. For more information, visit uiconf.com.

Recorded: July, 2015
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UI20: Convince Your Boss

Lauren Cramer

August 31st, 2015

You know it’s worth coming to UI20, but does your boss? Use this information and a summary of costs to help you get the green light.

Five Overall Benefits:

  1. Get the latest UX techniques.
  2. Network and learn what others are doing in the UX field.
  3. Improve individual and team design skills.
  4. Solve current design problems.
  5. Eliminate the need to hire outside UX personnel.

UI20 Delivers Proven Techniques and Best Practices for UX Designers

Get your team on the same page with proven UX methods and tools. Develop a shared understanding about the designs that will delight your customers. Attend two daylong workshops and a day of talks to learn the latest strategies and techniques for building great products.

Tackle Critical UX Topics and Move Projects Forward

  • Drive design decisions from scenarios of what your users will do with the design.
  • Move beyond digital design, delivering delightful cross-channel experiences.
  • Build a cohesive cross-product experience with defined standards and workflows.
  • Become part of the product strategy conversation by contributing UX perspectives.
  • Use cost-effective techniques to get user-focused decision-making throughout your project.
  • Create a design process that starts with the conversation you want your customers to have.
  • Communicate your design’s intent with the same language your developers use.
  • Incorporate Lean UX to discover and build what customers really want and need.

Summary of Costs

Conference fee: $1,475 (when you use code UI20ben by 9/12/15)
Hotel: $975
Flight: $300–$600
Transportation to and from airport: $5–$30
Food: $100
Total: $2,855–$3,180

 

Bring this printable version to help convince your boss next time you meet.

 

August Free Resources – Articles & Podcasts

Adam Churchill

August 31st, 2015

Missed some of the articles and podcasts we published in August.  Here they are.

Recent Articles

  • Content-First Design by Steph Hay
    Game designers start with the story, and then they design for discovery—learning in the moment not only increases retention and engagement, but it’s delightful and emotionally empowering.
  • Effective Remote Design by Jim Kalbach
    The fact is, remote design is already prevalent in our field. The odds are you’ll have to design with a distributed team, if you haven’t already. The question is how you’ll handle it when you do. With a little forethought, remote design can be as productive as working in person.
  • Preparing Organizations to Become Design-Infused by Jared Spool
    Getting a UX designer embedded on every team is a fantastic achievement for most organizations. It shows commitment to producing great experiences and is very difficult to accomplish. However, there’s still room for the organization to grow. Becoming a design-infused organization is the next level of maturity.

Recent Podcasts

  • Shifting to Continuous Deployment with Karen McGrane
    The speed of Agile delivery fundamentally changes the work process and puts new demands on the design cycle. What happens when the notion of deadline dates is replaced with a continual stream of experience enhancements by everyone in the organization?
  • Service Design: Creating Delightful Cross-Channel Experiences with Marc Stickdorn
    “Service design” describes a holistic approach to your users’ and customers’ needs, no matter where or when they’re interacting with your product or service. In traditionally siloed organizations, it can be no small task to ensure that you are providing the best possible service.
  • Using Scenarios to Solve Problems with Kim Goodwin
    Understanding is what user experience as a field hinges upon. After all, if you don’t understand how users are interacting with your product or service, you don’t know what to design for. But how, as a team, do you come to that understanding?

UIE Newsletter: Preparing Organizations to Become Design-Infused

Jared Spool

August 26th, 2015

In this week’s UIE newsletter, I define a design-infused organization as one where every decision is made with design at the forefront.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

It takes a long time to become a design-infused organization. Many have yet to make the transition. Some organizations are approaching it. These organizations value design enough to hire and embed designers in every project. They see how design is a competitive advantage.

Getting a UX designer embedded on every team is a fantastic achievement for most organizations. It shows commitment to producing great experiences and is very difficult to accomplish. However, there’s still room for the organization to grow.

Read the article: Preparing Organizations to Become Design-Infused.

How could your company improve to become more design-infused? Share your thoughts with us below.

Kim Goodwin – Using Scenarios to Solve Problems

Sean Carmichael

August 25th, 2015

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[ Transcript Available ]

Kim Goodwin

Understanding is what user experience as a field hinges upon. After all if you don’t understand how users are interacting with your product or service, you don’t know what to design for. But how, as a team, do you come to that understanding? Telling the story of a user’s journey highlights areas where you’re right on point and where you’re missing the mark.

Kim Goodwin says that storytelling is the most natural form of human communication. She posits that if we’re trying to be as human as possible in the design process and come up with the most human solutions, why not use one of the most basic tools that we as humans have? The cognitive barrier to listening to and processing a story is relatively low. Being able to communicate that story is a key contributor to getting a team on the same page.

Using scenarios and personas you can craft customer journey maps to better gauge how and when people are using your product. Working through these scenarios, especially early on in the process can uncover valuable insights and allow you to iterate quickly to ensure you’re heading in the right direction.

Kim will be presenting one of 8 daylong workshops at UI20 November 2-4 in Boston. For more information, visit uiconf.com.

Recorded: July, 2015
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Marc Stickdorn – Service Design: Creating Delightful Cross-Channel Experiences

Sean Carmichael

August 21st, 2015

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[ Transcript Available ]

Marc Stickdorn

Service design seems to go by an increasing array of names: Customer Experience, Cross-Channel UX, or even just “design thinking.” In most cases, these terms describe a holistic approach to your users’ and customers’ needs, no matter where or when they’re interacting with your product or service. In traditionally siloed organizations, it can be no small task to ensure that you are providing the best possible service.

Communication is at the heart of service design and Marc Stickdorn knows the core of it is getting everyone on the same page. He says that the importance of this lies in the fact that customer experiences sometimes aren’t tangible—a user or customer could be experiencing an internal event. It’s important to understand how different customers come in contact with the design.

One way of determining that is with a customer journey map. Being able to visualize the path a customer takes while interacting with your product is a powerful thing. It allows you to see the moments where they are engaged or perhaps need your service, but it also allows you to have a conversation about what happens between those moments. Being able to design for the exact moment your customer needs the design to function in a specific way creates a very delightful experience.

Marc will be presenting one of 8 daylong workshops at the UI20 conference, November 2–4, in Boston. For more information, visit uiconf.com.

Recorded: July, 2015
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UIE Newsletter: Effective Remote Design

Jared Spool

August 19th, 2015

In this week’s UIE newsletter, Jim Kalbach outlines his four key recommendations for successful remote design teams.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

There are numerous benefits to remote work: flexibility and better work-life balance for employees, and wider talent pools and reduced costs for employers, to name a few.

But what about remote design? Surely, designers won’t be required to work in distributed contexts. After all, our work is highly visual in nature. We need to be able to draw and point and gesture. We’re meant to work shoulder-to-shoulder.

…With a little forethought, remote design can be as productive as working in person.

Read the article: Effective Remote Design.

How has your company taken steps to improve its remote design implementation and collaboration? Share your thoughts with us below.

Snag Your Designer’s Toolkit by August 20 with Your UI20 Registration

Lauren Cramer

August 14th, 2015

The User Interface 20 Conference happens in Boston this November and dives deep into important UX topics. You’ll also get a special designer’s toolkit when you register by August 20.

Get Your Free Designer’s Toolkit

Toolkit

  • Iterate and share your thoughts in physical form
    with your team.
  • Capture all your awesome ideas during and 
    after the conference.
  • Avoid the time drain that digital tools cause
    when trying to create quick sketches and prototypes.

At UI20, you’ll choose from 8 different daylong workshops on scenarios, Lean UX, service design, product strategy, CSS, scalable design systems, user research, and content strategy. Plus you’ll have a full day of 75-minute presentations to hear from workshop leaders you didn’t choose. Three days you shouldn’t miss.

Register by 8/20 for this free designer’s toolkit

 

 

Designing Remotely – Jim Kalbach’s August 27 Virtual Seminar

Adam Churchill

August 13th, 2015

While remote work is on the rise, creative disciplines present unique challenges for remote collaboration. The visual interaction and open environment needed for creative work can be tricky to achieve in virtual settings. In Designing Remotely, Jim Kalbach teaches your team how effective remote design collaboration is possible.

Attend this seminar if you want to:

  • Get perspective and practical advice to handle different remote situations
  • Reduce behavior and process friction to encourage remote work
  • Discover tools for a digitally defined workplace
  • Unpack remote design case studies

Save your spot in this August 27 virtual seminar, or make it part of your 6-month program of virtual seminars.