UIEtips: Design’s Fully-Baked Deliverables and Half-Baked Artifacts

Jared Spool

July 9th, 2014

Creating artifacts is critical to convey our design ideas and decisions. Without these artifacts the design deliverables are likely to not meet the objectives and perform poorly. Today’s article discusses how artifacts and deliverables are connected and how the artifact eventually becomes the deliverable.

Both Leah Buley and Marc Stickdorn discuss the process and curation of artifacts in their full-day workshops at the User Interface 19 Conference in Boston, October 27-29. Learn more about all of the workshops.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

A design’s story isn’t just its final outcome. The story also needs to include the journey the team took to arrive at that outcome.

Artifacts are useful for communicating that journey. In fact, it can make for a very powerful presentation to stakeholders to show some of the artifacts that demonstrate the constraints, challenges, and thinking behind the final design.

Surfacing the effort can be both enlightening and entertaining. (After all, who doesn’t like the behind-the-scenes footage found in the DVD extras?)

Deliverables tell the story of what we think the design should be. Artifacts tell the story of how we got there. Each are powerful storytelling tools.

Read the article: Design’s Fully-Baked Deliverables and Half-Baked Artifacts.

How does you and your team overcome the challenge of differentiating between artifacts and deliverables? Leave us a note below.

One Response to “UIEtips: Design’s Fully-Baked Deliverables and Half-Baked Artifacts”

  1. Mel Hogan Says:

    This is something I struggle with all the time. Coming from a traditional graphic design background, getting out of the deliverables business is hard to do, but completely necessary to keep pace in an agile environment. I typically surface the artifacts contextually to aid discussion, but often fall back into polishing them into deliverables prior to doing so.

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