Jared M. Spool

Jared SpoolJared is Founding Principal of User Interface Engineering. He's been working in the field of usability and design since 1978, before the term "usability" was ever associated with computers. Jared has guided the research agenda and built UIE into the largest research organization of its kind in the world.

Jared is a top-rated speaker at more than 20 conferences every year. He is also the conference chair and keynote speaker at the annual User Interface Conference, and is on the faculty of the Tufts University Gordon Institute.

Jared's posts:

UIEtips: The Beginning of a Beautiful Friendship – Data and Design in Innovative Citizen Experiences

February 11th, 2014 by Jared Spool

Applications built on public data (think flight and train schedules) bring great benefits to their users. But the benefits they bring are highly dependent on how well the applications are designed. Designs will get better if the designers really watch users with the applications and use their feedback for updates.

Today’s article by Cyd Harrell is an excerpt from chapter 12 in the book Beyond Transparency. She discusses the relationship between data, design and the end user. Cyd’s workshop, Conducting Usability Research for Mobile Apps, dives into the usability research that captures these relationships in addition to other valuable information.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

The past decade has brought enormous and growing benefits to ordinary citizens through applications built on public data. Any release of data offers advantages to experts, such as developers and journalists, but there is a crucial common factor in the most successful open data applications for non-experts: excellent design. In fact, open data and citizen-centered design are natural partners, especially as the government 2.0 movement turns to improving service delivery and government interaction in tandem with transparency. It’s nearly impossible to design innovative citizen experiences without data, but that data will not reach its full potential without careful choices about how to aggregate, present, and enable interaction with it.

Read the article The Beginning of a Beautiful Friendship: Data and Design in Innovative Citizen Experiences.

What choices has your team made to present innovative experiences with both public and private data? Tell us about it below.

A Bias for Making

February 5th, 2014 by Jared Spool

Today’s UIEtips article looks at the communication process designers and developers follow to bring designs to life. From the waterfall approach to an Agile method, the common goal is creating, building, and executing better designs.

If you or your team struggles with communicating design objectives and process with developers and other key players, then you’ll want join us for Ben Callahan’s full-day workshop on workflow on responsive web design projects at UXIM April 7-9 in Denver, CO.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

Step into the Wayback Machine, Sherman, and set the dial to 1994. You’ll find me in a conference room, explaining to a room of developers and product owners (back then, we called product owners either product managers or business analysts) how we would design their new product in less than a week. The expression on their faces would be one of OMG! This dude is insane. (Though, “OMG” or “dude” wouldn’t be common parlance for at least another half decade).

We look at paper prototyping now and we think how quaint. Yet, back in 1994, it was a radical departure from established practice. In those olden days, design wasn’t done the way it is today.

Read the article A Bias for Making.

Does your team have a bias for making? Tell us about it below.

UIEtips: Designs and deliverables are haikus, not epic poems

January 29th, 2014 by Jared Spool

In today’s UIEtips, we’re publishing an excerpt from the UXmatters article “Developing UX Agility: Letting Go of Perfection” by Carissa Demetris, Chris Farnum, Joanna Markel, and Serena Rosenhan. In it, Chris Farnum talks about design deliverables and their role in an incremental approach to your design.

If you want to hear more about Chris’ thinking on design deliverables join us for our January 30 virtual seminar Choosing the Right Wireframe Strategy for Your Project.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

Once you have a firm grasp of the goals for a project and the functionality you need to design, the next steps for many UX professionals are creating user stories, wireframes, and prototypes. To kick off design, we often brainstorm and sketch. Often, cutting edge Web sites and a desire to meet or exceed competitors fuel our ideas in part. While you are in brainstorm mode, it’s certainly a good idea to sketch out a full user experience, complete with all the latest bells and whistles that would delight users and impress stakeholders.

But when you begin to craft a user experience for the initial stories that you’ll deliver to your Development team for implementation, you’ll need to be a strict editor and include only the core user interface elements. Limiting scope in this way can be challenging when you are used to waterfall approach, in which you may have only one chance to document all of the user interface elements you think your design should include.

Read the article Designs and Deliverables are Haikus, Not Epic Poems.

How does your team limit project scope in the early design stages? Tell us about it below.

Three Reasons To Register for UXIM Mobile by Jan. 30

January 28th, 2014 by Jared Spool

Sure there are many reasons to attend the UX Immersion Mobile Conference in Denver, CO April 7-9. But there are three specific reasons to register by January 30.

1. We’ll guarantee you get your first choice in workshops
There’s nothing worse than narrowing down your workshop decision and then finding out there’s no space for you. We guarantee that won’t happen when you register by January 30. To help you in your decision process we have very detailed workshop descriptions and video trailers. We’ll even guarantee your choice if you decide to change it up to two weeks later.

2. You’ll save $300
The price to attend all three days of the conference goes up $300 on Feb. 12. Why not save the money now plus get the camera. You’ll still save from Jan.31-Feb.11 BUT you won’t get that awesome camera to share your designs with remote teams and record you design ideas.

3. You’ll get your very own IPEVO Point 2 View Document Camera.
We’re always looking to bring you new resources, processes, and techniques to help you become a better designer. When you register for the UXIM conference by January 30, you’ll get a great new tool – the IPEVO document camera. The camera was so popular with the UI18 attendees, we decided to give it to the UXIM attendees too.

So don’t wait any longer. You only have a few more days to guarantee your first choice in workshops, save $300, and get the IPEVO camera. Explore the conference at UXIM.co

Atlanta UXers – Get Ready for a Day of UX Awesomeness

January 28th, 2014 by Jared Spool

UX Thursday – The one and only local, full day conference designed just for user experience pros is on its way to Atlanta!

UIE and Vitamin T have joined forces to bring you a great group of Atlanta UX luminaries for a day of real-life case studies. Plus you’ll hear two fantastic keynote presentations from Adam Connor of Mad*Pow and me. This is wonderful opportunity to spend quality time exchanging ideas with participants and presenters. (The number of attendees is limited to assure you’ll get quality time with both.)

I’ll kick off the day with my keynote, “It’s a Great Time to Be A UX Designer” and then be joined by these kind (and knowledgeable) folks:

Federico Holgado, Lead UX Developer, MailChimp
Robert Hamburger, Senior User Experience Lead, CNN
Melinda Baker, Digital Experience Architect, American Cancer Society
Klemens Wengret, UX Architect, Turner Broadcasting
Josh Cothran, User Experience Designer, Georgia Tech Research Institute
Colleen Jones, Principal, Content Science
Closing keynote from Adam Connor, Design Director, Mad*Pow

But that’s not all. After hearing all these great talks, we’ve put together a social cocktail hour afterwards to discuss all the interesting ideas you heard throughout the event. All in all it’s an action packed day.

Be sure to join us on February 20 (it’s a Thursday, if you hadn’t guessed!), but don’t wait until the last minute. Our Chicago and Detroit UX Thursday shows sold out in a jiffy.

And at $99 for Early Birds through February 7, you’ve got no reason to miss it! Register now.

Get more info over at the UXT site!

UIEtips: Group Improvisation

January 23rd, 2014 by Jared Spool

Designers are constantly thinking about their process, workflow, and ways to improve both. In today’s UIEtips, we feature an article from Ben Callahan that offers an alternative approach to web design and development.

At this year’s UX Immersion Mobile Conference Ben is giving a full-day workshop on workflow with responsive web design projects. He’ll show you how to manage expectations and create stronger products faster.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

In 1959, Miles Davis got a few of the most talented jazz musicians of all time together in a recording studio in Manhattan. The album they were about to record would go quadruple platinum and still be selling 5,000 copies a week in 2013. The title of that album was Kind of Blue and today it’s considered by many to be the greatest jazz record of all time.

The musicians Miles was playing with didn’t know what they were going to record when they arrived at the studio. In fact, Miles didn’t even really know. The only preparation he had was a handful of modal scales and a few melody ideas. No sheet music or chord charts. No rehearsals or overdubbing techniques. The first time the band made it through a track is the take that’s on the album. Though web design and modal jazz may seem worlds apart, there’s a lot that improvisational records like Kind of Blue have to teach us about our process-crazed industry.

Read the article Group Improvisation.

What techniques does your team use to improve collaboration? Tell us about it below.

Conducting Usability Research for Mobile Apps

January 23rd, 2014 by Jared Spool

Mobile changes everything about how we conduct usability research. With the right strategy, we can quickly understand our users’ behavior, wherever they are.

Join Cyd Harrell at the UX Immersion Mobile Conference, April 7-9 in Denver to learn the latest techniques for interviewing, gathering data, and involving your entire team.

You’ll learn how to:

  • Lead strong mobile-research evaluations
  • Envision studies even at the concept stage
  • Determine when to do (or not do) usability testing
  • Use mobile-research tools to study users’ questions
  • Recruit users for specific operating systems
  • Involve teams and stakeholders in the research

At Cyd’s workshop, Conducting Usability Research for Mobile Apps, you’ll participate in small-group and individual activities to hone your research and interview techniques. Wear comfortable walking shoes; you’ll need them for observing mobile users on-the-go. You’ll also dig into some diary studies to see what “research platform in your pocket” means.

You’ll discuss:

  • Designing a mobile-specific research plan
  • Collecting user data with mobile devices
  • Conducting user interviews on-the-go
  • Adding research — without blowing budgets

Cyd’s been doing remote research since 2007. When she was at Bolt | Peters she even developed methods to broadcast remote research sessions to observation teams. Today, as the UX lead for Code for America, Cyd regularly performs research on mobile phones from low-income residents through smartphone-happy elite populations.

In short, she’s The Expert. So don’t miss her at UXIM14.

A Tool No UX Designer Should Be Without

One of the tools Cyd uses for remote usability studies is her document camera. It’s a great way to have remote teams participate and to permanently capture the study. Get your own IPEVO document camera when you register for the UXIM Mobile Conference by January 30. Find out more about all the workshops and the IPEVO camera at UXIM.co.

Improve Communication With Your Remote Team

January 22nd, 2014 by Jared Spool

OK. Your meeting is going perfectly. Then a remote team member says, “I don’t understand. Can you show me what you mean?”

PANIC! MEETING IS DERAILING!

But you’re about to save the day. You plug in your trusty IPEVO document camera and focus in on the pen and paper. As you make your sketch you begin to hear folks saying, “I get it,” and the whole team is back on track.

How do you get this nifty tool? You register for the UX Immersion Mobile Conference by January 30.

Why You Need the IPEVO Document Camera:

  • Share your design ideas and sketches with remote teams to ensure everyone is on the same page
  • Document individual sketches during design studios to a digital file for easy access in the future
  • Project sketches to large audiences to convey your designs
  • Get everyone participating and working together saving time and increasing productivity
  • Conduct usability tests remotely while letting the team back in the office watch

Register by January 30 to Get Your Free IPEVO

We’re always looking to bring you new resources, processes, and techniques to help you become a better designer. Now we have a great tool that we’re excited to include with your UXIM registration, the IPEVO document camera. But it’s only available until January 30 so be sure to register now.

Explore the conference and IPEVO camera at UXIM.co.

Workflow on Responsive Web Design Projects

January 20th, 2014 by Jared Spool

The old workflow of designing for the desktop and a tablet, working up images in Photoshop or Fireworks, falls apart with responsive design. With the growing number of mobile devices, how do you design for the multitude of screen sizes? What priority will elements take on shrinking screens? How can designers make their intentions clear for developers ready to code? These are some of the questions Ben Callahan’s workflow seminar will answer.

With Ben, learn to manage expectations and create stronger products, faster by:

  • Structuring teams to be more flexible
  • Planning responsive projects, from soup-to-nuts
  • Designing interfaces using faster methods
  • Managing expectations and doing testing
  • Pushing “the whole” instead of “the parts”
  • Using more than one tool
  • Learning to let go of control

When Ben Callahan speaks, everyone listens. He has been a leading voice in making flexibility the core of responsive design workflows. Don’t miss his full-day workshop at UXIM14 in Denver, CO on April 7.

You’ll learn how to:

  • Build small “surgical” teams to maximize collaboration
  • Delay decisions until the last responsible moment
  • Overcome “baggage” that hampers a responsive process
  • Facilitate a collaborative design process that’s still adaptable
  • Convince others that responsive web design is a competitive advantage
  • Identify when trust waivers, then address it with transparency

Ben will help you overcome common workflow challenges. He’ll also offer practical, relatable takeaways from real-world stories and case studies from his own experiences in running projects.

If your design process is missing something and you want to know how to shift the focus from the process to the people involved—check out this workshop.

Get inspired at the UXIM Mobile Conference.

UIEtips: Atomic Design

January 14th, 2014 by Jared Spool

It’s quite common for designers to develop design systems and libraries of patterns. A designer can save a considerable amount of time if they develop a reliable design system. One that goes beyond colors, fonts, grid etc but rather focuses more on how the various elements and parts become a whole. In today’s UIEtips, we feature a post from Brad Frost where he explains a methodology for creating design systems. It’s called Atomic Design. It’s a term rising in popularity.

We’re fortunate that Brad is giving a daylong workshop at this year’s UXIM conference in Denver, April 7-9. He’ll show you how your design team can establish a practical foundation to make flexible, adaptive UIs. Learn more about Brad’s workshop, Using Atomic Design to Create Responsive Interfaces.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

The thought is that all matter (whether solid, liquid, gas, simple, complex, etc) is comprised of atoms. Those atomic units bond together to form molecules, which in turn combine into more complex organisms to ultimately create all matter in our universe.

Similarly, interfaces are made up of smaller components. This means we can break entire interfaces down into fundamental building blocks and work up from there. That’s the basic gist of atomic design.

Read the article Atomic Design.

Does your company build interfaces using atomic design patterns? Tell us about it below.