Steph Hay – Designing with a Content-First Approach

Sean Carmichael

July 22nd, 2015

Play

[ Transcript Available ]

Steph Hay

Usability in products and websites is what most organizations strive for. The more usable the product, the more likely that people will use it. Through research and testing, you can root out many issues with clunky interactions that hinder the experience. What isn’t as immediately clear is if some perceived usability issues are actually understandability problems. Your content could be the culprit.

Steph Hay is the Director of Content Strategy at Capital One. She’s an advocate of using a Content-First method. At the base level, if your content works, it goes a long way toward improving your entire experience. Rather than letting the design dictate what the content can be, starting with a focus on what the content is can influence the design in positive ways.

Even testing the content in a Google Doc with users can uncover some serious hurdles very early in the process. This allows you to objectively evaluate the usefulness of the content without what could be the distraction of a beautiful design or layout. After determining the appropriate words, you can then plug them into your design instead of using placeholder text that could be creating inappropriate line lengths. A beautiful design can be really nice to look at, but a beautiful design with the right content will be far more usable.

Steph will be presenting one of eight daylong workshops at the UI20 conference November 2–4 in Boston. For more information, visit uiconf.com.

Recorded: July, 2015
[ Subscribe to our podcast via Use iTunes to subscribe to UIE's RSS feed. ←This link will launch the iTunes application.]
[ Subscribe with other podcast applications.]

Read the rest of this entry »

UIEtips: Designing with Scenarios – Putting Personas to Work

Jared Spool

July 22nd, 2015

Storytelling is a natural form of expression. We’ve all been telling stories from a very young age. In the design process, personas become the tool we use to tell our users’ stories. And with good personas in place, usage scenarios can become the micro-stories that drive your design decisions.

Kim Goodwin tells us that scenarios put the design into the context of how and why the user will interact with it. In 2011 Kim presented a UIE Virtual Seminar, Designing with Scenarios: Putting Your Personas to Work.

Today’s UIEtips article is based on a discussion UIE’s Adam Churchill had with Kim. It’s based on two questions from the seminar: Do you need data to effectively do scenarios, and what’s the difference between scenarios and storyboarding?

Read the article: Designing with Scenarios: Putting Personas to Work.

What’s your experience with scenarios? Are you using data when developing them? Share your thoughts with us below.

A User-centered Approach to Product Planning and Visioning – Christine Perfetti’s August 6 Virtual Seminar

Adam Churchill

July 21st, 2015

Learn how to create a long-term vision for your product, establish consensus and buy-in across your organization, and prioritize opportunities for the product roadmap. In A User-centered Approach to Product Planning and Visioning, Christine Perfetti teaches your product team to create roadmaps and prioritize opportunities that align with your long-term product strategy.

Attend this seminar if you want to:

  • Map out a unified, long term vision for your product that aligns with user needs
  • Learn a collaborative, iterative approach to product visioning
  • Run your own product visioning workshops

Save your spot in this August 6 virtual seminar, or make it part of your 6-month program of virtual seminars.

 

Jeff Gothelf – Discover What Customers Really Want with Lean UX

Sean Carmichael

July 17th, 2015

Play

[ Transcript Available ]

Jeff Gothelf

When some people hear the term Lean UX, they dismiss it as simply a nouveau buzzword. There can be some confusion as to its relationship to Agile, both the methodology and the adjective. Some of the biggest resistance came from the idea that Lean UX was shortcutting and lazily undoing much of the groundwork to get organizations to buy into the value of UX. But as waterfall development increasingly becomes “the old way” of doing things, teams are operating in more agile, or Lean, ways.

Jeff Gothelf co-wrote the Lean UX book with Josh Seiden. Over the years since the book was released, he has seen the initial resistance to the idea die down. The conversation has shifted to domain-specific challenges and how Lean UX can address those.

It all comes back to research and the idea of the Minimum Viable Product. This isn’t to confuse an MVP for the “first conceivable thing we can ship.” Getting your product in front of customers early in the process lets you test any hypotheses you have about both the product and your customer base. Uncovering misconceptions up front allows you to iterate and pivot to arrive not just at the best design, but the right one.

Jeff will be presenting one of 8 daylong workshops at the UI20 conference. For more information, visit uiconf.com.

Recorded: July, 2015
[ Subscribe to our podcast via Use iTunes to subscribe to UIE's RSS feed. ←This link will launch the iTunes application.]
[ Subscribe with other podcast applications.]

Read the rest of this entry »

UIEtips: Why Lean UX?

Jared Spool

July 15th, 2015

In this week’s UIEtips, we reprint an article from Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden. They show us why Lean UX is important.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

Lean UX is deeply collaborative and cross-functional, because we no longer have the luxury of working in isolation from the rest of the product team. We can’t continue to ask our teams to wait for us to figure it all out.

Read the article: Why Lean UX?

How do you implement Lean UX? Tell us about it below.

Get 50% off When You Bring Someone to the UX Advantage Conference

Lauren Cramer

July 10th, 2015

Save Big on the UX Advantage Conference

Register you and another for the UX Advantage Conference in Baltimore, August 18–19, and you’ll get rewarded with a half price ticket for yourself.

Learn from 14 inspirational pioneers who are delivering user experience as a competitive advantage to their organizations. In live, on-stage interviews, Jared Spool and Karen McGrane talk with design leaders who are at the forefront of redefining their industries.

You and your co-worker will hear from UX leaders at PayPal, Capital One, Fidelity, GE, U.S. Digital Services, and more as Jared Spool and Karen McGrane interview them on how they are using UX as a competitive edge.

Register someone at the current price and you’ll get 50% off your ticket. This is a combined savings of over $900 off the registration price. But hurry, this offer ends on Friday, July 17.

 

 

UI20: Save $300 When You Register by July 16

Lauren Cramer

July 9th, 2015

Take Advantage of the $1,475 Rate—Register by July 16

Save money and guarantee your spot in the workshops of your choice. Register for the User Interface 20 Conference, November 2–4, 2015, in Boston. But hurry because the lowest rate of $1,475 ends July 16.

Your UI20 registration includes:

  • Two daylong workshops and a day of featured talks from the workshop presenters
  • Complete conference materials from all the workshops and talks
  • Post conference access to video recordings of the featured talks
  • A designer’s toolkit to help you create communicate your design ideas
  • Immediate access to UIE’s All You Can Learn. This resource includes virtual seminars from many of the UI20 workshop leaders plus past conference recordings.

 

 

“Both the workshops and speeches were extremely useful and inspiring. The whole experience was beyond my (high) expectations!” —Juha R., past UI conference attendee

“This was a stellar conference. It reinvigorated me. Mad props to the presenters. I learned an incredible amount of stuff, socialized, ate well, and loved all of it.” —Mackenzie R., past UI conference attendee

UIETips: Making Companies Competitive by Expanding Design’s Role

Jared Spool

July 8th, 2015

In this week’s article, I explore the positive effects of expanding design awareness in organizations.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

In the last few years, companies like GE, Fidelity, Marriott, MasterCard, IBM, Paypal, Nasdaq, and Capital One have realized they can gain a competitive advantage by producing better downstream user experiences. They’re driving change in their industry by helping their customers’ organizations deliver better experiences in their own products and services. It’s not good enough to delight your direct customers. You have to delight all the customers and employees down the supply chain.

Read the article: Making Companies Competitive by Expanding Design’s Role.

How are you using design to become more competitive? Let us know below.

Bruce McCarthy – UX and Product Roadmaps

Sean Carmichael

July 8th, 2015

Play

[ Transcript Available ]

Bruce McCarthy

Product Managers are responsible for the success of a product. As we’ve seen, UX is not misaligned with business goals, in fact it helps achieve those goals. If UX has become a necessity in terms of a driver of business, product managers need to adapt to it. Those who have a respect and understanding for the value of UX, and incorporate it into their product strategies, can better serve their users and customers, as well as the business.

In business, competition is the core of what drives innovation and consumer loyalty. But this doesn’t mean catching up to your competitors in some feature-checklist war. What sets your product apart from others and what about it delights your users? Engaging in user research can tell you how your customers use your product but more importantly why they use it that way.

That question of “why” can be very important. If the users of your product are requesting what seems to be a simple fix, such as moving a button, there could be a greater underlying reason. So rather than just accepting the request and acting on it, using research to uncover that “why” can lead to a new use case that you weren’t actively supporting. This in turn can lead to greater opportunities for the business as a whole.

Bruce will be presenting one of 8 daylong workshops at UI20, November 2-4 in Boston. For more information about his, and the other workshops, visit uiconf.com.

Recorded: June, 2015
[ Subscribe to our podcast via Use iTunes to subscribe to UIE's RSS feed. ←This link will launch the iTunes application.]
[ Subscribe with other podcast applications.]

Read the rest of this entry »

UIETips: Incorporating Content Strategy into Your Information Architecture

Jared Spool

June 30th, 2015

In this week’s article, Margot Bloomstein shares examples of how organizations are successfully incorporating content strategy into their information architecture.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

What’s in, and what’s out? “In my experience, it is very easy for brilliant information architects (or UX people who do information architecture) to underestimate the importance of editorial planning, voice and tone, and detailed guidelines for content creation. And conversely, it’s very easy for highly skilled content people to underestimate how much information architecture has to do with things other than content: the finicky details of application behavior and interaction design, in particular. I’m a huge fan of collaborations between information architects who care about editorial concerns and content strategists who love structure and talking about data. But whatever your situation, it’s important to know your way around structural design, if only so that you can provide useful feedback and support.”

Read the article: Incorporating Content Strategy into Your Information Architecture.

Are you incorporating content strategy into your company’s information architecture? Let us know below.