Bruce McCarthy – Product Management Meets UX

Sean Carmichael

September 4th, 2014

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Bruce McCarthy

Product roadmaps are a useful tool for managers and the development they oversee. Usability testing and research informs user experience decisions. Both of these goals, in the end, benefit the users. So why can’t your process contribute to both of these goals?

Bruce McCarthy, through his years of experience, has developed a methodology to get the product and UX teams working in concert. Using clickable prototypes and mockups lets the product team prioritize their roadmap and the UX team get early feedback. This creates an environment to inform the design without committing a lot of time and resources to it. With both teams validating their assumptions you can arrive at the right path faster.

Bruce received a lot of questions during his seminar, Lean Roadmapping: Where Product Management and UX Meet. He joins Adam Churchill to address some of those in this podcast.

  • How do you handle disagreements on what should be prioritized?
  • Should you have separate road maps for product development and higher level management?
  • When is it ok to use a lower fidelity prototype?
  • How do you find interview participants for your research?
  • What approach do you take to sifting through the data you collect?
  • How can you be confident when showing the design to only a small number of people?
  • How does this process apply to a more mature product versus an MVP?

Recorded: July, 2014
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Improve Your Mobile Design Skills with Luke Wroblewski

Lauren Cramer

September 3rd, 2014

Luke Provides the Latest Mobile Insights and Design Considerations

If you’re looking for ways to update existing mobile designs and rock future ones, then listen up to what Luke Wroblewski has to share.

Why Mobile Techniques Matter

  • Conversions: define problems and optimize for the job
  • Influence: sound arguments and data that inform decision-making
  • Engagement: prioritize and help users get things done

Luke Wroblewski

As one of mobile designs leading authorities, Luke Wroblewski will change the way you approach mobile-first. He’ll share practical implementation methods at his full-day workshop, Mobile Design Essentials, on October 27 at UI19 in Boston.

There you’ll learn to:

  • Simplify interfaces without dumbing them down
  • Use different organizational techniques for navigation systems
  • Validate user inputs in-line and in-context
  • Deal with sensitive inputs and manage input masks

As someone championing mobile-design first, Luke is the person to hear from. Get ready to learn an informed, balanced approach from the best teacher in the industry.

Learn more about Luke’s workshop

UIEtips: Mobile as Medium — an Interview with Luke Wroblewski

Jared Spool

September 3rd, 2014

Life would be so simple if all you had to do was reuse your existing website design for mobile devices. Well if you are doing that, you’re making a serious mistake. Today’s article is an excerpt from an interview that Jared Spool had with Luke Wroblewski back in June where they discuss the dangers of not designing for mobile.

We’re excited to have Luke Wroblewski do a daylong workshop on Mobile Design Essentials at this year’s UI19 Conference on October 27. Discover how this workshop will change your thinking.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

You start with the mobile experience. You make sure everything is great for that form factor, entering phone numbers and the like. What you’ll also find is, if you make it work well in the more constrained mobile environment, then it’s actually going to be a benefit on the bigger screen as well.

Read the article: Mobile as Medium–an Interview with Luke Wroblewski.

What considerations do you make when designing for mobile? Leave us a note below.

Ben Callahan – Responsive Workflows: There’s No Perfect Process

Sean Carmichael

August 29th, 2014

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Ben Callahan

The web is everywhere. It’s on our desks, in our pockets, and on screens of all sizes. The complexity involved with building a website grows with each new device it must support. This cross-platform consistency requirement makes a concrete, static design process unsustainable. As flexible and responsive as the sites we’re building have to be, so too does our process for building them.

In his virtual seminar, Responsive Workflows: Because There’s No Such Thing as a Perfect Process, Ben Callahan explains that there is no one way to produce a website. He believes that team managers need create an environment where a fluid process can exist and be nurtured. Ben received many questions from our audience during the live seminar. He joins Adam Churchill to tackle some of those in this podcast.

  • What concerns do organizations have when you present this process?
  • What tools are utilized in responsive workflows?
  • How do you keep the team on the same page?
  • What is a content priority guide?
  • How does business strategy tie into a responsive workflow?

Recorded: July, 2014
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What Will You Tell Your Peers about Your Conference Experience?

Lauren Cramer

August 28th, 2014

Spend time among the brightest minds in UX

The UI19 workshop leaders are there for you and ready to answer your questions. Attendees tell us things like, “The workshops and speeches are extremely useful and inspiring.” “The accessibility of the different speakers. I can literally walk up, get a handshake, say hi, and talk.”

Attendees express their thoughts on the UI Conference

Luke Wroblewski

Luke Wroblewski

 

Beautifully executed and well delivered. Tons of great info, I’m energized to apply what I learned.

Learn about Luke’s workshop, Mobile Design Essentials.

Stephen Anderson

Stephen Anderson

 

Excellent – hands-on workshop that helped motivate and inspire new ways to think about data and how to display in UI design.

Learn about Stephen’s workshop, Design for Understanding.

Dan Saffer

Dan Saffer

 

It’s a great course to actually practice designing microinteractions – you’ll get tons of ideas and develop an eye for looking into the details.

Learn about Dan’s workshop, Designing Microinteractions.

Leah Buley

Leah Buley

 

Group activities were well selected and planned out. Discussion after each activity was very elaborate and informative.

Learn about Leah’s workshop, UX as a Team Sport.

Explore all the workshops »

UIEtips: Service Design – Pushing Us Beyond the Familiar

Jared Spool

August 26th, 2014

In a conventional UX approach, we’d focus on the bits. With service design, we go beyond and think about the cross-channel experience. Today’s article discusses the intricacies of service design and why you need to pay attention to it.

If you find yourself stumbling into the service design world with little direction, then Marc Stickdorn’s workshop at the UI19 conference is perfect for you. Marc will show you how to create a cohesive customer experience by expanding beyond digital and designing for every customer touch point. Explore his workshop, Service Design: Creating Delightful Cross-Channel Experiences.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

User research isn’t the only aspect of digital UX practice that we need to change when we start doing service design work. We need to look at how we prototype services, how we think about the information organized in the service delivery, how the service looks, and what behaviors we want each party to have when interacting in our designed experience.

Read the article: Service Design-Pushing Us Beyond the Familiar.

How have you blended your digital and non-digital channels to create better user experiences? Leave us a note below.

UIEtips: UX Strategy Blueprint

Jared Spool

August 20th, 2014

In this week’s UIEtips, Jim Kalbach defines and discusses how to consistently create a UX strategy. Here he shares a tool with you for doing so at your organization—the UX Strategy Blueprint.

If your strategy discussions feel more like political battles than progressive team-building, pay attention to Jim Kalbach. His virtual seminar on Thursday, August 28 is all about Defining a UX Design Strategy.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

Analysis and planning, while necessary inputs and outputs in the strategy creation process, are not the core of strategy. You can’t analyze your way to strategy: the answers don’t magically emerge from data. And detailed roadmaps don’t provide the rationale for the activity they organize. Strategy does. It connects analysis and planning with an intentional logic that guides decision making.

Read the article: UX Strategy Blueprint.

Do you have a UX Strategy Blueprint to define your UX strategy? Leave us a note below.

Sarah Horton and Steve Faulkner – HTML5 Accessibility

Sean Carmichael

August 20th, 2014

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A Podcast for Everyone artwork

Web accessibility takes place on a foundation of technologies, the most common of which are developed and maintained by the Worldwide Web Consortium, or W3C. Its success is dependent on how well these underlying technologies support accessible user experiences. Fortunately for us, people like Steve Faulkner devote much of their time to ensure technology specifications, such as HTML5, include the hooks that make it possible to build an accessible and enjoyable user experience for everyone. Including people who use assistive technologies, such as screen reader and screen magnification software, and different display and interaction modalities, such as user stylesheets and keyboard navigation.

The web was created with accessibility as part its framework. Steve’s focus is to ensure accessibility remains a fundamental component of the web’s foundational technologies. Steve is co-editor of the HTML5 specification. He has been closely involved in other W3C specifications development, including the Accessible Rich Internet Applications (WAI-ARIA) specification. In this podcast Steve joins Sarah Horton to tell us about:

  • The current status of the HTML5 specification
  • How WAI-ARIA and HTML5 work together to support accessibility
  • How accessibility is integrated into specification development
  • What it’s like to work on a W3C specification

Steve Faulkner has been working in accessibility since 2001, first with Vision Australia and currently with The Paciello Group (TPG), where he is Principal Accessibility Engineer. He is involved with several W3C working groups, including the HTML Working Group and the Protocols and Formats Working Group, and is author of the helpful resource, Techniques for providing useful text alternatives. He is also creator and lead developer of the Web Accessibility Toolbar, a resource for evaluating web accessibility.

Recorded: June, 2014
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UIEtips: Principles Over Process – Four Core Tenets for How to Work as a Team of One

Jared Spool

August 13th, 2014

As a solo UX design practitioner, you may think setting up a specific process is best to get others within your organization on board. But that’s not necessarily the case. In today’s UIEtips, we offer an excerpt from Leah Buley’s book UX Team of One. Leah covers four principles to follow to achieve success as a the sole UX designer within an organization.

Are you a lone UX designer at your company trying to figure out how to get others on board with the UX process? At the UI19 Conference in Boston, October 27-29 Leah’s workshop UX as a Team Sport will show you how to involve peers, bosses, and users in the design process. Learn more about her workshop.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

Principles are deceptively simple; they’re just statements, really. They are a way for you to articulate a vision for what your user-centered approach should ultimately entail. Principles can apply to not just what you make, but also how you work. Think of the following principles as core tenets for how to work as a team of one. With startling consistency, the most happy and successful teams of one explain that it’s their mindset, not just their methods, that keep them going.

Read the article: Principles Over Process – Four Core Tenets for How to Work as a Team of One.

How have design principles improved the end result of your UX project? Leave us a note below.

A Human-Centered Design Process

Lauren Cramer

August 12th, 2014

Better collaboration skills matter

If you think you might find yourself on a team planning UX strategy—or on a team planning anything, really—this workshop is brimming with information that will turn you into a skilled collaborator.

A human-centered design process

  • Focus: Conducting research with the right people within budget and time constraints
  • Buy-in: Participate in and facilitate discussions in a way that moves things forward
  • Results: Design for the customer to create effective products and happier teams

Leah Buley


Leah Buley
has insights that will leave you inspired to tackle even the trickiest parts of being on a team. She’ll share these game-changers in UX as a Team Sport, her full-day workshop at the User Interface 19 Conference, October 29 in Boston.

In Leah’s workshop, you’ll learn to:

  • Establish a realistic strategy
  • Get buy-in from upper management on human-centered design approach
  • See the touchpoints your customers experience

If you’ve ever heard Leah talk, you know how intoxicating her presentation style is and how well she understands this topic. Leah’s workshop will transform how you see collaboration.

Register for UI19 by August 31 with promotion code BLOGUI19 and you’ll get $300 off the 3-day conference price.

Explore Leah’s and 7 other workshops