Archive for the 'Design Decisions' topic

Dan Klyn – Determining What Good Means with Performance Continuums Live!

In considering your user’s experience with your design, keep in mind that there’s a difference between something looking good and being good. But how do you determine good? How can you measure it? If, for example, you’re a print company building a digital presence, do you focus on retention or acquisition based on the shifting experience? It’s easy to ask for something that already exists, but much harder to describe something that one might want or need.

UIEtips: Debunking the Myths of Innovation: An Interview with Scott Berkun

Being innovative sounds scarier than it really is. It doesn’t necessarily mean creating something new, but perhaps repurposing something in a new way that brings added value to a user. Scott Berkun is a master of looking at the concept of innovation from all different angles. In this article he debunks the myths around innovation. […]

Brian Suda – Data Visualizations that Pack a Punch

Creating visualizations from data can be a powerful and intriguing way to present findings. But way too many design teams sit on vast amounts of data. They also spend entirely too much time making static images rather than interactive tools.

UIE Book Corner: Dan Brown’s “Designing Together”

Dan believes that collaboration and conflict—that’s right, conflict—are the basis for good design. The book itself evolved from his Surviving Design Projects card game. Dan joins us for this podcast to discuss his book, and his thinking around collaboration and managing conflict.

Agenda Amplifiers

Recently, I was in a meeting where a designer was showing off an analytics chart featuring their site’s bounce rate. “See how the bounce rate is 96%,” the designer told the audience. “People are coming to the site, getting bored with the content, and leaving immediately. We need to redesign the page to make it […]

Kim Goodwin – Using Scenarios to Design Intuitive Experiences

Scenarios can represent the ideal picture of a user’s experience with a product or service because you can see how and when they’ll interact. However, a scenario is often missing the details of what’s going on at this moment in time and that can be a sticking point. This is where the value of the journey map emerges.

UIEtips: Replacing “Requirements Gathering” with Something That Works

In this week’s UIEtips, I talk about replacing “requirements gathering” with something that works. Here’s an excerpt from the article: You’ve seen the box on the project schedule a hundred times. It always has the same label: “Gather Requirements”. And it’s always remarkably short — scheduled for just a day or two (or sometimes less!). […]

View Two Samples of the UXIM OnDemand Content

Our annual UX Immersion Mobile conference was jam-packed with insights from some of today’s UX Mobile experts. If you missed out on Seattle back in April, you can still get a piece of the experience through UXIM OnDemand. This awesome resource allows you and your team to access all the audio, video, and session materials from UXIM 2013. Here’s a sample of the talks.

UIEtips: Designing Microinteractions

In this week’s UIEtips, I talk to author and interaction design guru Dan Saffer about microinteractions. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Jared: What are microinteractions? Dan: Microinteractions are the small pieces of functionality that exist around or sometimes in place of larger features. An example is turning off the ringer on your phone. Nobody […]

Dan Saffer – Designing Microinteractions

Do you think about the ringer on your phone and the ability to turn it off? Dan Saffer uses this example to kick off his book Microinteractions. Silencing the ringer on your phone is a common feature. If that feature is clunky or hard to find it interferes with needing to silence it quickly, in a crowded movie theatre for example. These tiny interactions that surround the main functionality are integral to rounding out the entire experience.