Archive for the 'Design Decisions' topic

Agenda Amplifiers

Recently, I was in a meeting where a designer was showing off an analytics chart featuring their site’s bounce rate. “See how the bounce rate is 96%,” the designer told the audience. “People are coming to the site, getting bored with the content, and leaving immediately. We need to redesign the page to make it […]

Kim Goodwin – Using Scenarios to Design Intuitive Experiences

Scenarios can represent the ideal picture of a user’s experience with a product or service because you can see how and when they’ll interact. However, a scenario is often missing the details of what’s going on at this moment in time and that can be a sticking point. This is where the value of the journey map emerges.

UIEtips: Replacing “Requirements Gathering” with Something That Works

In this week’s UIEtips, I talk about replacing “requirements gathering” with something that works. Here’s an excerpt from the article: You’ve seen the box on the project schedule a hundred times. It always has the same label: “Gather Requirements”. And it’s always remarkably short — scheduled for just a day or two (or sometimes less!). […]

View Two Samples of the UXIM OnDemand Content

Our annual UX Immersion Mobile conference was jam-packed with insights from some of today’s UX Mobile experts. If you missed out on Seattle back in April, you can still get a piece of the experience through UXIM OnDemand. This awesome resource allows you and your team to access all the audio, video, and session materials from UXIM 2013. Here’s a sample of the talks.

UIEtips: Designing Microinteractions

In this week’s UIEtips, I talk to author and interaction design guru Dan Saffer about microinteractions. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Jared: What are microinteractions? Dan: Microinteractions are the small pieces of functionality that exist around or sometimes in place of larger features. An example is turning off the ringer on your phone. Nobody […]

Dan Saffer – Designing Microinteractions

Do you think about the ringer on your phone and the ability to turn it off? Dan Saffer uses this example to kick off his book Microinteractions. Silencing the ringer on your phone is a common feature. If that feature is clunky or hard to find it interferes with needing to silence it quickly, in a crowded movie theatre for example. These tiny interactions that surround the main functionality are integral to rounding out the entire experience.

UIEtips: Why Lean UX?

In this week’s UIEtips, Jeff Gothelf lays out his rationale for why Lean UX is something new and why it’s important now. Here’s an excerpt from the article: When bringing our craft to software in the 1980s and 1990s, designers approached software in the same way we approached the earlier materials we worked with. In […]

Broaden Your Mobile UX Knowledge with 10 Hours of Recordings

Designers have a huge challenge in front of them: Address the users’ growing demand and expectations of exceptional user experience regardless of which mobile device they use. UXIM OnDemand confronts this challenge. Purchase these recordings for just $189 until June 21. Luke Wroblewski – Create designs without compromising optimization Kelly Goto – Design with your […]

UIEtips: Experience Rot

In this week’s UIEtips, I explain the dangerous effects of experience rot on user experience. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Here’s a counter-intuitive fact: Chances are all those features you’ve been adding to your design are hurting your user experience. Every feature that’s squeezed in, in the name of giving your design a competitive […]

Richard Rutter – Typography in Responsive Web Design

Typography wears many hats in the user experience world. It’s part of the overall look of the visual design. It can convey tone and meaning of the content. Well set type can improve the user experience through readability and be an important piece of the accessibility puzzle for users with low vision. As with most things involving the web these days, typography isn’t immune to the disruption caused by mobile and multi-device design.