Archive for the 'Development' topic

What Happens When Agile Messes Up Your UX Process

It’s quite something when you get to the point when your UX process is working well. It all seems to flow together. You’re getting input into the early part of the process. You’re ready when the requirements show up. You’ve got a solid set of deliverables that the developers look forward to receiving. Everything fits […]

Jeff Gothelf – Lean UX: Integrating Design into Agile

Lean UX can eliminate the contractual obligations inherent with specification documents and other deliverables. Designers and developers find it frustrating to put so much effort into a project then not see it ship at the end. Using the Lean UX process, you’re constantly validating your designs, especially early in the process. This motivates the team to work towards the same end goal.

Anders Ramsay – Designing with Agile
A Virtual Seminar Follow-up

There’s a belief that user experience insight is lacking in Agile development. Trying to shoehorn UX practices into an Agile process results in a lot of frustration. Often, developers build stuff faster than the designers can design it. The whole process often focuses on the delivery more than the quality of the experience. Anders Ramsay believes that UX and Agile can coexist.

Jeff Gothelf – Lean UX: Getting Out of the Deliverables Business
A Virtual Seminar Follow-up

The goal of Lean UX is to take the focus of user-centered design off of documentation and put it squarely on the experience. The way to do this is to view any design idea as a hypothesis. With a focus on the experience, you can validate or invalidate this hypothesis much quicker. The sooner you reach this validation, the sooner you can focus on designing and building the correct solution.

Anders Ramsay – Applying Agile Values to UX

The Agile development process is accused often of being too focused on delivery over the user experience. But that’s not to say that Agile is the bane of UX. Anders Ramsay believes it’s important to distinguish between Agile methods and Agile values. Many, such as fast prototyping and shared understanding are also valuable in the user experience world.

Jeff Patton – Story Mapping for UX Practitioners: Tying Agile and UX Together

Story mapping is a way to build a model of user experiences. More than that, in the Agile context, it allows you to tactically plan for what should go into each release. It is a way to get everyone on the team thinking and talking about user experience. Getting people into a discussion mode starts to create a very collaborative environment. Jeff discusses how to create a story map and how it fits into the Agile process.

UIEtips: 12 Best Practices for UX in an Agile Environment – Part 2

From a user experience perspective, it’s clear what you need to do in a waterfall process. You need to gather any research that will affect the requirements, before the requirements are done. You need to test your designs before the designs are signed off. You need to evaluate the functionality as it’s being built. And […]

UIEtips: 12 Best Practices for UX in an Agile Environment – Part 1

When shooting the movie, the director doesn’t necessarily film the scenes in the order they’ll appear once edited. Instead, the filmmakers shoot the pieces according to other constraints, such as the availability of actors or locations, or accommodating variability in the weather. It’s not unusual for the movie’s final climax to be among the first […]

Tying Agile & UX Together

Story mapping is a way of organizing Agile user stories that communicate user experience. Agile expert Jeff Patton will show you how this technique helps you put the big picture of UX and the little pictures of Agile in one place. Users will always have an experience with your product. Story mapping will pull your UX focus into the organization’s process and ensure that experience is a great one.

Stephanie Sullivan Rewis and Greg Rewis – What Designers Need to Know About HTML5 and CSS3

The introduction of CSS3 and HTML5 brought with it a host of new capabilities. With most modern browsers supporting CSS3 and HTML5, implementing them into your designs is becoming easier. Understanding the things that are now possible with these new standards can help you create better designs more efficiently and effectively than ever before. Stephanie and Greg discuss what the introduction of HTML5 and CSS3 means for designers and developers, and what can be accomplished today by putting it into practice.