Archive for the 'HTML5' topic

Websockets and Why Designers Should Learn To Code

HTML5 has an awesome feature that’s now gaining attention from designers: Websockets. It’s a way to create a persistent communication channel between the client and a server, without using page refreshes or the asynchronous mechanics behind AJAX. Think much faster communications, because it’s not establishing a new connection for each round trip. Look at this […]

Jason Grigsby – Responsive Web Design with Mobile in Mind

With the mobile web, specifically m dot sites increasingly becoming a thing of the past, responsive web design has become common practice. The ability for your site to display across screen sizes and devices, reduces development time and allows for one design to work anywhere. However, this shouldn’t signal a shift away from mobile-first thinking.

Nate Schutta – Coding Mobile Prototypes

The “designer who can code” has been dubbed the elusive unicorn of the UX realm. But more important than being equally good at both skill sets is being able to communicate with the other side. If designers understand even a little bit about code it breaks down silos within the team. Greater communication leads to shared understanding. This collaborative environment allows for faster iteration and better design.

View Two Samples of the UXIM OnDemand Content

Our annual UX Immersion Mobile conference was jam-packed with insights from some of today’s UX Mobile experts. If you missed out on Seattle back in April, you can still get a piece of the experience through UXIM OnDemand. This awesome resource allows you and your team to access all the audio, video, and session materials from UXIM 2013. Here’s a sample of the talks.

Jason Cranford Teague – Prototyping a Responsive Design

With the emergence of techniques like responsive web design, many of the traditional prototyping methods become difficult to employ. Sketches and wireframes have in some cases given way to HTML and CSS prototyping so that users and clients can experience a richer, more complete interaction.

UIE’s Most Popular Resource and Content Tweets: 8/13 – 8/18

Here’s a recap of the resources and information we shared on Twitter last week. UX Design Ensure the study answers specific research questions, always —A Story About a Crappy UX Study via @johnnyholland Journey to The Heart of UX Design: Debunking Myths – UX Booth Email Sign-up Cool idea to encourage folks to sign up […]

Aaron Gustafson – Adapting Your Designs with Progressive Enhancement

It’s difficult to predict how users will access your designs and your content. More and more, people are connecting to the internet through some sort of mobile device. Using the latest advances in HTML and CSS can leave aspects of your site incompatible with some browsers. How do you ensure that you’re providing a good experience to your users over a broad spectrum of scenarios?

Start Full Screen: Organize, Communicate, & Annotate HTML Prototypes – A Special 3/7 Online Seminar

If your team is transitioning from static documentation to iterative HTML prototypes, then Nathan Curtis’ March 7 seminar, Start Full Screen, is right up your alley. Nathan will talk about how his team at EightShapes brought it’s renowned modular philosophy of modular components and libraries for producing PDFs to prototyping using simple HTML, CSS and […]

UIEtips: A Snapshot on What Designers Need to Know about HTML5 and CSS3

Could the new changes with HTML5 and CSS3 create a utopian society? Doubtful, but what it can do is make a designer’s life a lot easier and bring about more SEO results. A few weeks ago I interviewed Stephanie (Sullivan) Rewis and Greg Rewis to find out what they’ll cover in their UI16 workshop, Everything […]

Stephanie Sullivan Rewis and Greg Rewis – What Designers Need to Know About HTML5 and CSS3

The introduction of CSS3 and HTML5 brought with it a host of new capabilities. With most modern browsers supporting CSS3 and HTML5, implementing them into your designs is becoming easier. Understanding the things that are now possible with these new standards can help you create better designs more efficiently and effectively than ever before. Stephanie and Greg discuss what the introduction of HTML5 and CSS3 means for designers and developers, and what can be accomplished today by putting it into practice.