Archive for the 'mobile' topic

UIEtips: Responsive Design for Apps

In this week’s UIEtips article, Jason Grigsby tackles the concept of responsive design for mobile apps. He looks at widgets for desktop and mobile and explores the idea if phones are really different platforms than tablets. When it comes to incorporating and understanding mobile first responsive design, Jason Grigsby is one of the UX superstars […]

Improve Your Mobile UX with These Six Podcasts

Below we feature the six UX luminaries giving full-day workshops at the UX Immersion Mobile Conference, April 7-9 in Denver, CO. Each of these podcasts brings insights on how to improve communication and workflow with your team and users. Structuring Your Workflow for Responsive Web Design by Ben Callahan With the need for the web […]

Get Lifetime Access to the UXIM 2013 Recordings for Free

Get the UXIM 2013 OnDemand Recordings on us! We’re celebrating the fantastic program at this year’s UX Immersion Mobile Conference by giving everyone lifetime access to the 2013 sold out conference. Hear the same great content as the attendees from these top UX experts who shared their best practices for improving mobile UX skills. Luke […]

Stephen Hay – Responsive Web Design Workflow

The web is no longer fixed width. Designs are more malleable than ever because of fluid grids, media queries, and everything else that comes with responsive web design. This makes using static photoshop comps as a deliverable unmanageable. Design workflows inevitably have to change and adapt as the way we design for the web evolves.

Conducting Usability Research for Mobile Apps

Mobile changes everything about how we conduct usability research. With the right strategy, we can quickly understand our users’ behavior, wherever they are. Join Cyd Harrell at the UX Immersion Mobile Conference, April 7-9 in Denver to learn the latest techniques for interviewing, gathering data, and involving your entire team. You’ll learn how to: Lead […]

Brad Frost – Creating Responsive Interfaces

Frameworks and design patterns are no strangers in the world of web design. As responsive web design becomes common practice, making sure these templates work across every imaginable screen and device is trickier. There have been attempts to break down page elements in separate modules, but you often never see it fully assembled.

Jason Grigsby – Responsive Web Design with Mobile in Mind

With the mobile web, specifically m dot sites increasingly becoming a thing of the past, responsive web design has become common practice. The ability for your site to display across screen sizes and devices, reduces development time and allows for one design to work anywhere. However, this shouldn’t signal a shift away from mobile-first thinking.

Coding Prototypes, Even if You’ve Never Tried

An hour of prototyping can save days of meetings and misunderstandings. Collaborate with developers earlier to refine interactions; your team — and users — will thank you for it. Let Nate Schutta take the scare out of using JavaScript and jQuery to build mobile prototypes, using HTML and CSS in a text editor, and debugging […]

Nate Schutta – Coding Mobile Prototypes

The “designer who can code” has been dubbed the elusive unicorn of the UX realm. But more important than being equally good at both skill sets is being able to communicate with the other side. If designers understand even a little bit about code it breaks down silos within the team. Greater communication leads to shared understanding. This collaborative environment allows for faster iteration and better design.

Aaron Gustafson – Designing Across Devices with Progressive Enhancement

Responsive web design seems to come up in every other discussion or article about UX these days. And rightfully so as it’s an elegant way to make sure your design adapts to the multitude of devices on the market. But with the Internet of Things looming, it’s becoming more than just the visuals of your site that are of major concern. How your content displays on a car dashboard, “can a watch handle this page weight?”, or “is this refrigerator JavaScript enabled?” are not unrealistic issues moving forward.