Archive for the 'Users' topic

Whitney Quesenbery and Frances Harris – Researching Daily Life

Accessibility is often focused on how to design and build digital products or physical spaces. But understanding the people with disabilities who will use those products is just as important. Enter ethnography and the importance of research that goes “face to face” with real people in the real world.

Strengthen Your UX Skills with UI19 Videos

Strengthen Your UX Skills with 9 Videos from the UI19 Conference Make you and your team better designers with these videos from nine UX experts for just $99. Hear these latest techniques, proven practices, and important UX ideas. You can even use these videos for team lunch and learns or individual training. Watch the videos whenever you […]

Cyd Harrell – Techniques for Mobile Research

The so called Digital Divide is increasingly being filled with mobile devices. Because of that, you need an understanding of how your designs are appearing and behaving on smaller screens. Cyd Harrell is an expert on user research, and the one we to turn for mobile research. She says that it’s not just how your designs display on these devices but also the behavior of your users as they interact on these more personal gadgets. Users consider their mobile phones to be a much more private device than a desktop computer.

UIEtips: Smart Watches, Wearables, and That Nasty Data Rash - Part 2

In this week’s UIEtips, we’re reprinting part two of an article from Josh Clark, Smart Watches, Wearables, and That Nasty Data Rash. You can read part 1 here. In the article, Josh takes his insight on mobile design to the world of wearables. He makes an argument that through design, we can avoid information poisoning […]

UIEtips: Smart Watches, Wearables, and That Nasty Data Rash - Part 1

In this week’s UIEtips, we’re reprinting part one of an article from Josh Clark, Smart Watches, Wearables, and That Nasty Data Rash. In the article, Josh takes his insight on mobile design to the world of wearables. He makes an argument that through design, we can avoid information poisoning and prevent the risk of the […]

UIEtips: Embracing the Medium

In this week’s UIEtips, we reprint an article. In it, Richard Rutter discusses the web and its role as a medium. Richard argues that we should consider the fact that a user can shape their experience as a strength rather than a weakness. Here’s an excerpt from the article: The wonderful thing about the web […]

Whitney Quesenbery and Joe O’Connor – Accessible WordPress

WordPress powers over 25 million sites with more than 14 billion pages viewed each month, making it one of the most popular web publishing platforms. Imagine if every one of those sites was accessible. Joe O’Connor has been a leader in making that happen, through the WordPress accessibility team which works from the inside to make WordPress into a web publishing platform for everyone.

UIEtips: Promise, Vision, Scenario, and User Stories

Creating delightful experiences doesn’t happen by chance. To do it right, you have to think about the promise you offer and how you’re delivering it. To do this you need scenarios to provide the context. In this article, I show you how the promise, vision and scenario work together. Scenarios are used throughout so much […]

Steph Hay – Content-first User Experience

In traditional website design and development it’s common to start with the design and add your content later in the process. You may even use “lorem ipsum” as a placeholder to know where the content eventually needs to live. This causes the content creator to craft words to fit the design instead of building a design to fit the content. Without the right content your users will likely have a lackluster experience no matter how good-looking the design.

Whitney Quesenbery and Lainey Feingold – Structured Negotiations

If you work in user experience or accessibility, you probably spend part of your time on advocacy–making the case for a new design idea or a new way of working. Lawsuits are the ultimate way to get two sides to come to an agreement, but it’s also an extremely confrontational style of advocacy. A more collaborative process might be a better way to reach your goal with an agreement that is a win for everyone.