Ultra-Contextual Design

Jared Spool

July 21st, 2017

In today’s post, we’re happy to share an article on Contextual Design from Abi Jones.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

The first step in creating a context­-aware system is understanding the context for use. There are two levels for contextual understanding, the broad context for the user journey and the ultra­-contextual aspects of each touchpoint within the journey.

Read the article Ultra-Contextual Design.

How do you implement contextually-aware designs? Tell us about it below.

Get Your Users What They Need to Solve Their Problems

Jared Spool

July 18th, 2017

Come to UI22 for the most effective ways to solve users’ problems and achieve business goals through design.

A price increase for this incredible conference is coming soon. A ton of folks have already registered at the lowest price and this event will sell out.

The agenda is pretty awesome. The food is incredible. There are abundant chances to meet new and interesting people. I will grab your attention on Tuesday with a captivating keynote. And let’s not forget the amazing full day workshops that will challenge you to change the way you practice design:

Don’t miss your chance to improve the UX design skills you need to succeed.

Come And Own The Experience

Despicable Design – When “Going Evil” is the Perfect Technique

Jared Spool

July 14th, 2017

In this week’s article, I discuss how “Going Evil” can break creative log jams and encourage collaboration.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

In many other exercises where you ask a group to talk about user experience, the designers often take over. They have the experience and generate ideas faster than their peers, so they dominate the discussion. This has the effect of pushing the non-designers aside.

Yet, in this exercise, making a design worse goes against every bit of training those designers have. It slows them down.

The people who believe they’re not designers can jump right in. A bonus is there’s no wrong answer. You can’t make something “not bad enough.” There’s always room for more badness.

Plus, it’s fun. Giggling. Laughing. Snickering. The room is alive and vibrant. This is a creative exercise with no downside. Everyone gets involved.

Read the article: Despicable Design – When “Going Evil” is the Perfect Technique

Have you had to “Go Evil” to foster a creative breakthrough? Tell us about it below.

Don’t assume you’re designing for people just like you.

Jared Spool

July 10th, 2017

Don’t assume you’re designing for people just like you.

Registration for UI22 is in full swing. A ton of folks have already registered and this event will sell out. Maybe it’s because I’m the keynote speaker. Maybe it’s because the agenda is pretty awesome. Maybe people just love the incredible food and abundant chances to meet new and interesting people. Or it could be one of the amazing full day workshops that will change the way you think about and practice design:

Don’t miss your chance to improve the UX design skills you need to succeed.

Come To Understand What Your Users Want

Effective Remote Design

Jared Spool

July 7th, 2017

In this week’s article, Jim Kalbach outlines four key recommendations for successful remote design teams.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

There are numerous benefits to remote work: flexibility and better work-life balance for employees, and wider talent pools and reduced costs for employers, to name a few.

But what about remote design? Surely, designers won’t be required to work in distributed contexts. After all, our work is highly visual in nature. We need to be able to draw and point and gesture. We’re meant to work shoulder-to-shoulder.

…With a little forethought, remote design can be as productive as working in person.

Read the article: Effective Remote Design.

How has your company taken steps to improve its remote design implementation and collaboration? Share your thoughts with us below.

Execution is Everything

Jared Spool

June 30th, 2017

There are thousands of good ideas thrown about daily, but to execute just one good idea takes considerable effort. It requires that a team stays focused and in tune with the goal. It requires a system for execution – OKRs. That’s what Christina Wodtke brings in this week’s article.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

I almost never hear a new idea. In fact, it’s rare I hear an idea I haven’t thought of myself, unless it’s in an industry I’m unfamiliar with. It’s not because I’m a genius (I’m not). It’s that ideas are easier to come up with than you think. What’s hard — really hard— is moving from an idea to a reality. It’s hard to find the right form of an idea, a form that will let consumers see its value, understand how to interact with it, and feel excited enough to pay for it.

Read the article: Execution is Everything.

Have you taken any ideas from concept to reality? Leave us a note below.

Ideas Are Worthless Without Action

Jared Spool

June 27th, 2017

Deliver scalable, cohesive, and elegant designs that delight your users

At the UI22 Conference November 13 – 15 in Boston, you get exposed to intensive material that will challenge how you think about and practice design.

Regardless of how many days you come, your registration gets you:

  • Your choice of two daylong workshops and/or a day of featured talks
  • One month of complimentary access to UIE’s All You Can Learn that starts right when you register
  • All the workshop materials and presentations
  • Video recordings of all the featured talks
  • Time with the UI22 workshop leaders and featured talk speakers to ask your UX questions
  • New skills to move your UX design initiatives forward

Set Your Design Direction With Confidence

Getting a Clue: Journey Mapping and the Rashomon Effect

Sean Carmichael

June 23rd, 2017

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[ Transcript Available ]

We often talk in terms of silos in organizations, where information isn’t readily shared and communication leaves something to be desired. Another way to think of a team who is heads-down working on the overall journey is to imagine swim lanes. Each department is so focused on their own part of the experience that they might not be fully aware of each step a user has to go through to complete the journey.

In this episode, Conor Ward, Head of UX and Design at Centrica & British Gas, tells a story of how mapping out the journey to acquiring a quote for boiler insurance revealed some unexpected insights. Jim Kalbach, author of Mapping Experiences, also joins the podcast to share his expertise on the subject of journey mapping.

Recorded: June 2017
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Replacing “Requirements Gathering” with Something That Works

Jared Spool

June 16th, 2017

In this week’s article, I discuss the process of gathering requirements to inform the project’s design.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

You’ve seen the box on the project schedule a hundred times. It always has the same label: “Gather Requirements”. And it’s always remarkably short — scheduled for just a day or two (or sometimes less!).

When I ask the project manager what this step involves, they inevitably tell me they’ll interview the major stakeholders and gather up the requirements that emerge. It’s going into the fields and picking berries needed for the project.

How do these major stakeholders know these requirements? Well, they just do. They’ve been thinking about it for a while (except for the ones who haven’t). They’ve talked to customers (except for most of them, who never talk to customers). They’ve talked to the sales people and the technical folks and the business modeling folks, who told them exactly what’s needed to make this product successful (but how do those folks know?).

Read the article: Replacing “Requirements Gathering” with Something That Works

How have you dealt with requirements gathering? Let us know below.

Sticky Situations and Unexpected Solutions — Lean UX Outside the Lab

Sean Carmichael

June 8th, 2017

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[ Transcript Available ]

Sometimes, the world of user experience design requires creative solutions. There are numerous methodologies and an even greater number of myths about where and when they are supposed to be used. Lean UX is one such process that is associated mostly with startups and very early stage projects.

But what if you were to apply Lean UX to an existing site? And what if that site was a multinational industry-leader with millions of users?

In this episode of the UIE Podcast, Austin Knight, Senior UX Designer at Hubspot, discusses how the Hubspot team employed Lean UX to tackle their website’s redesign. Jeff Gothelf, the co-authour of Lean UX and Sense & Respond, joins us to offer his insights on Austin’s efforts.

Recorded: May 2017
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