UIE Article: Service Design Thinking

Jared Spool

July 6th, 2016

This week, we present an article written by Marc Stickdorn on Service Design Thinking, and what it means to design physical products and services using the process.

Here’s an excerpt from the article

Service Design became more and more popular over the last years. Service Design refers to innovating both tangible products and services and is nowadays used, to connect people and technologies across multiple channels. The boundaries between physical products and services are blurring and mostly one doesn’t exist without the other anyway. We need to think in systems and understand the ecosystem in which services and physical products operate.

Read the article: Service Design Thinking

Have you engaged in Service Design Thinking? Tell us about it below.

Amy Jo Kim – Turbocharge Your Product Design with Game Thinking Live!

Sean Carmichael

July 6th, 2016

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You’ve got a groundbreaking product idea, and you’ve assembled a crack team of designers. You know exactly what you want to do, but you’re unsure of how to do it. Without a framework to drive your product development, it’s game over.

Amy Jo will show you how a game designer approaches their product development and how they get to a design that their users love. From her research in how game designers think, you learn the value of refining and testing a simple, stripped down MVP (minimum viable product), long before you start adding all the fancy stuff.

To see the video of Amy Jo’s talk, visit the UX Immersion: Interactions section in our All You Can Learn Library.

Recorded: April, 2016
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Chris Risdon – Shaping Behavior, by Design Live!

Sean Carmichael

June 30th, 2016

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Mobile, ambient technology, and connected devices are about mediating people’s behavior in their environments. Uncovering the whys and hows that drive behavior takes empathy, hours of observation, and masterful prototyping skills. You’ll succeed when you make, test, iterate, and learn.

Chris will explore the importance of engaging with users at the behavioral level. He’ll explain prototyping’s key role in closing the feedback loop on your designs. You’ll leave with an understanding of the best types of making and prototyping for observing and eliciting behaviors.

To see the video of Chris’s talk, visit the UX Immersion: Interactions section in our All You Can Learn Library.

Recorded: April, 2016
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UIE Article: Preparing Organizations to Become Design-Infused

Jared Spool

June 29th, 2016

In this week’s article, I recount what is takes to become a design-infused organization.

Here’s an excerpt from the article

Becoming a design-infused organization is the next level of maturity. These organizations realize that everything affects the users’ experience. If the technology is chosen poorly, the user will be frustrated by poor performance or limited capabilities. If the wrong functions are implemented, or too many are shoved into the design, the user will become frustrated by the complexity of completing their objectives. Everyone on the team needs to think about how they affect the experience.

A design-infused organization is one where every decision is made with design at the forefront. When choices are available to the team, they’ll all choose the one that provides the best experience.

Read the article: Preparing Organizations to Become Design-Infused

Made the transition to a design-infused organization? Tell us about it below.

UIE Article: Design’s Fully-Baked Deliverables and Half-Baked Artifacts

Jared Spool

June 22nd, 2016

In this week’s article, I revisit the topic of artifacts and deliverables within the design process.

Here’s an excerpt from the article

Deliverables are how we tell the story of what the design will be. Of course, the classic deliverable is the finished product itself. Nothing tells the story of the design better than the product.

In the days of old, the finished product was the only deliverable. There were no plans or blueprints, just what the craftsman completed.

Collaboration across the organization changed all that. Others needed to know our intention—what we wanted the design to be. Thus, intermediate deliverables were born.

Read the article: Design’s Fully-Baked Deliverables and Half-Baked Artifacts

How have deliverables changed since you started designing? Tell us about it below.

Marc Rettig – Change the Story—and the Conversation Live!

Sean Carmichael

June 16th, 2016

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Design leaders are unsung revolutionaries. They’re often at the forefront of culture change, advocating for a new conversation about creativity and quality. The old one involved meetings, presentations, and top-down mandates, and little to no input from customers.

Expand your palette of culture-shifting tools and discover the power of conversation. Marc will show you how to facilitate interactions between people and groups that lead to meaningful change. You’ll leave this talk feeling empowered to go back home and start your own conversational revolution.

To see the video of Marc’s talk, visit the UX Immersion: Interactions section in our All You Can Learn Library.

Recorded: April, 2016
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UIE Article: Becoming a UX Unicorn in 5 Easy Steps

Jared Spool

June 15th, 2016

In this week’s article, I revisit what is takes to become a UX Unicorn.

Here’s an excerpt from the article

We first heard the unicorn moniker bandied about when job ads started showing up asking for designers who could do interaction design, information architecture, visual design, and even a little coding. The hiring managers seemed to want someone who could do everything. “Who could that possibly be?”, exclaimed the seasoned designers. “Nobody could do all that and be any good,” they’d say.

Since nobody could do all of these things, the jobs would be dismissed as a unicorn hunt. The expectation is the company would come to their senses and hire a team of folks to get the collection of skills they need.

Read the article: Becoming a UX Unicorn in 5 Easy Steps

What do you expect from a UX Unicorn? Tell us about it below.

Dan Saffer – Practical Creativity Live!

Sean Carmichael

June 10th, 2016

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Creativity isn’t just about expressing yourself. It’s also about solving problems by putting disparate pieces together to form a new, unique whole. Practical Creativity fuels the everyday work and once-in-a-lifetime breakthroughs of designers, engineers, and scientists.

So what can you do when you feel stuck, blocked, or just plain uncreative? Dan will share his easy, practical tricks for getting unstuck, as well as simple daily practices that you can use to keep your mind energized and your creative tank full. You’ll be so inspired, you’ll want to use them all right away.

To see the video of Dan’s talk, visit the UX Immersion: Interactions section in our All You Can Learn Library.

Recorded: April, 2016
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UIE Article: Group Improvisation

Jared Spool

June 8th, 2016

This week we reprint an article from Ben Callahan who shares his thoughts on what makes a great team.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

If you read through the Kind of Blue liner notes [by Miles Davis] written by pianist Bill Evans, you’ll come across this quote:

“Group improvisation is a challenge. Aside from the weighty technical problem of collective coherent thinking, there is the very human, even social need for sympathy from all members to bend for the common result.”

Bill is highlighting two distinct challenges they faced in making this recording. The first is the challenge of the group, which he describes as “the weighty technical problem of collective coherent thinking.” The second is the challenge of the individual, which he explains as “need for sympathy from all members to bend for the common result.” These two challenges are part of every team that’s ever existed, including yours and mine as we build the web. So, how do we build a process within which our teams can fully collaborate and a team that’s willing to do so?

Read the article: Group Improvisation

What makes a great team? Tell us about it below.

Hagan Rivers – Crushing Enterprise App Navigation Issues Live!

Sean Carmichael

June 1st, 2016

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The only job of application navigation is to get users to the right screen. Ideally, all of your users should find what they need in 10 seconds or less, and with only a few clicks. But many enterprise app navigation systems fall short. If you’re facing a much-needed navigation overhaul and don’t know where to start, it can be overwhelming.

Hagan will show you where to start, how to approach the problem, and what success looks like. You’ll get a feel for the philosophy that guides her work, the decisions she makes during the process, and the types of user research she regularly employs. You’ll go home with a whole new outlook on enterprise navigation.

To see the video of Hagan’s talk, visit the UX Immersion: Interactions section in our All You Can Learn Library.

Recorded: April, 2016
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