Archive for the 'Content Strategy' topic

UIE Article – Designing Embraceable Change

In this week’s article we reprint an article where I talk about changing your sites at an adaptable rate. Here’s an excerpt from the article: The employees had become accustomed to the intranet and knew how to find the things they needed. Even when an employee couldn’t find something, there was always someone within earshot […]

UIE Article – What Really Matters: Focusing on Top Tasks

In this week’s article Gerry McGovern talks about organizing tasks. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Top Tasks Management is a model that says: “Focus on what really matters (the top tasks) and defocus on what matters less (the tiny tasks).” Tiny tasks are a nightmare for web teams. On their own, these tasks seem […]

UIE Article: Extraordinarily Radical Redesign Strategies

In today’s article, I discuss three radical redesign approach strategies. Here’s an excerpt from the article: It’s your most loyal customers who will hate your flip-the-switch redesign the most. Designers are quick to declare, “Users hate change.” But that’s not it at all. Your loyal users have invested a lot over the years mastering your current design, […]

UIE Article: For an Edge Condition, Seeing the Problem is a Problem

In today’s article, I discuss how to design a great experience even while troubleshooting.  We must design for the solution, not the problem. Here’s an excerpt from the article: If they understood the situation, they could interview the mechanics, pilots, gate agents, and operations personnel after the fact. However, that presents its own problems. It’s […]

Testing Your Content Is the Missing Link

Typically when we conduct usability tests we watch how a person moves from one task to another. Where do they click? Why did they take that action? But we should also look to see if usability issues are actually understandability problems. That’s one of the topics that Steph Hay and I discussed in a recent podcast, […]

UIE Article: Content and Design Are Inseparable Work Partners

It’s not uncommon within organizations that web site content is treated differently and separately from the web site design process. Yet the users do not separate the two and see it as one experience. When the content and design process are not done hand-in-hand, poor user experiences is often the result. Today we re-print an […]

How Are You Getting Your Team on the Same Page?

While developing the topics and workshop leaders for this year’s User Interface 20 Conference in Boston, November 2–4, I realized that a general theme was emerging—getting everyone on the same page about your designs. Here’s how each workshop at UI20 contributes to this theme: Marc Stickdorn’s workshop on Service Design: Creating Delightful Cross-Channel Experiences is about […]

Testing Versions of Your Content Might Be the Missing Link for a Useful Design.

Usability in products and websites is what most organizations strive for. Through research and testing, you can root out many issues with clunky interactions that hinder the experience. What isn’t as immediately clear is if some perceived usability issues are actually understandability problems. If your content works, it goes a long way toward improving your […]

UIE Newsletter: Content-First Design

In this week’s UIE newsletter, we reprint an article from Steph Hay. In it she investigates the art of interactive storytelling in the video game industry. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Game designers start with the story. What they add to the experience complements and builds on the core story; it doesn’t distract from the […]

Steph Hay – Designing with a Content-First Approach

Usability in products and websites is what most organizations strive for. The more usable the product, the more likely that people will use it. Through research and testing, you can root out many issues with clunky interactions that hinder the experience. What isn’t as immediately clear is if some perceived usability issues are actually understandability problems. Your content could be the culprit.