Archive for the 'CSS3' topic

CSS Grid And Accessibility

Now that we have the ability to separate source from design using CSS Grid, the likelihood that some creators will overlook accessibility is high. When we can easily reorder items in the display, we should be careful to also reorder them in the source, explains Rachel Andrew, lest we create havoc for screen readers. Ideally, developers will […]

Complex layouts are within reach with CSS

What is so phenomenal about CSS Grid is that it can do natively what developers had to achieve in the past through hacks, table layouts, and floats. CSS Modules now available—Flexbox, CSS Grid Layout, and Box Alignment—are changing layout on the web. Why? Because designers have the flexibility to create and explore layouts they were […]

How to Talk with Your Developers

Speaking the same language as your developers is hugely beneficial and knowing some CSS will help you do that. Having this common language aids in creating a more collaborative feel to conversations with developers versus dictating to them what to do. That’s why we’ve asked Jenn Lukas to give a full-day workshop at the UI20 Conference […]

Rachel Nabors – Using Animation to Enhance Your UX

Animation in interfaces has traditionally been seen as purely decorative and unnecessary. There are real accessibility and usability concerns associated with a heavy reliance on Flash. Advances in CSS have allowed for sophisticated animations and transitions that actually add to the experience. In fact, a well timed transition can help alleviate the cognitive load on users.

Stephen Hay – Responsive Web Design Workflow

The web is no longer fixed width. Designs are more malleable than ever because of fluid grids, media queries, and everything else that comes with responsive web design. This makes using static photoshop comps as a deliverable unmanageable. Design workflows inevitably have to change and adapt as the way we design for the web evolves.

Jason Grigsby – Responsive Web Design with Mobile in Mind

With the mobile web, specifically m dot sites increasingly becoming a thing of the past, responsive web design has become common practice. The ability for your site to display across screen sizes and devices, reduces development time and allows for one design to work anywhere. However, this shouldn’t signal a shift away from mobile-first thinking.

Nate Schutta – Coding Mobile Prototypes

The “designer who can code” has been dubbed the elusive unicorn of the UX realm. But more important than being equally good at both skill sets is being able to communicate with the other side. If designers understand even a little bit about code it breaks down silos within the team. Greater communication leads to shared understanding. This collaborative environment allows for faster iteration and better design.

Aaron Gustafson – Designing Across Devices with Progressive Enhancement

Responsive web design seems to come up in every other discussion or article about UX these days. And rightfully so as it’s an elegant way to make sure your design adapts to the multitude of devices on the market. But with the Internet of Things looming, it’s becoming more than just the visuals of your site that are of major concern. How your content displays on a car dashboard, “can a watch handle this page weight?”, or “is this refrigerator JavaScript enabled?” are not unrealistic issues moving forward.

View Two Samples of the UXIM OnDemand Content

Our annual UX Immersion Mobile conference was jam-packed with insights from some of today’s UX Mobile experts. If you missed out on Seattle back in April, you can still get a piece of the experience through UXIM OnDemand. This awesome resource allows you and your team to access all the audio, video, and session materials from UXIM 2013. Here’s a sample of the talks.

Richard Rutter – Typography in Responsive Web Design

Typography wears many hats in the user experience world. It’s part of the overall look of the visual design. It can convey tone and meaning of the content. Well set type can improve the user experience through readability and be an important piece of the accessibility puzzle for users with low vision. As with most things involving the web these days, typography isn’t immune to the disruption caused by mobile and multi-device design.