Archive for the 'Design Decisions' topic

The KJ-Technique: A Group Process for Establishing Priorities

In this week’s article I talk about the KJ-Method. Here’s an excerpt from the article: The KJ-Method is simple and easy to do. It focuses the group on the task at hand and is excellent at eliminating unnecessary discussion and distractions from the goal. It’s a tool that everyone should have in their designer’s toolbox. […]

Users Don’t Hate Change. They Hate Our Design Choices.

In this week’s article I talk about UX design choices. Here’s an excerpt from the article: For years, we studied teams rolling out new designs, to see if we could mitigate negative reaction to new releases and design changes. We studied hundreds of product and service rollouts. We watched and learned from the reactions of […]

Beans and Noses

In this week’s article I talk about dealing with difficult clients. Here’s an excerpt from the article: I’m sure you run into them all the time. You’re in a room and someone with power has decided to do something that just doesn’t make sense. You’ve tried logic. You’ve tried rational discourse. Yet, they are intent. […]

Communicating With Design

Design influences behavior by guiding and motivating people to do something, to take an action, or, by contrast, slowing them down. Some design choices create unintended negative experiences by creating a type of friction for the user: a complicated checkout process, an even more complicated password retrieval workflow. Alternatively, we create a more positive brand of […]

Goal Challenges and Tool Challenges

In today’s article, I discuss how to design for two types of challenges.  If users are distracted by controlling the interface, they can’t pay attention to the thing they came to do. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Two Dots’ designers also needed to put in tools to control the play of the game, such as changing levels, […]

Despicable Design – When “Going Evil” is the Perfect Technique

In this week’s article, I discuss how “Going Evil” can break creative log jams and encourage collaboration. Here’s an excerpt from the article: In many other exercises where you ask a group to talk about user experience, the designers often take over. They have the experience and generate ideas faster than their peers, so they […]

Replacing “Requirements Gathering” with Something That Works

In this week’s article, I discuss the process of gathering requirements to inform the project’s design. Here’s an excerpt from the article: You’ve seen the box on the project schedule a hundred times. It always has the same label: “Gather Requirements”. And it’s always remarkably short — scheduled for just a day or two (or […]

Sticky Situations and Unexpected Solutions — Lean UX Outside the Lab

Sometimes, the world of user experience design requires creative solutions. There are numerous methodologies and an even greater number of myths about where and when they are supposed to be used. Lean UX is one such process that is associated mostly with startups and very early stage projects.

But what if you were to apply Lean UX to an existing site? And what if that site was a multinational industry-leader with millions of users?

Design Cop-out #2: Breadcrumbs

In this week’s article I revisit the topic of breadcrumbs as a treatment for a symptom, instead of a way to address the root of a problem. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Most sites that provide breadcrumbs show the location variety. In this case, each page displays the optimal path the user could’ve clicked on to get it. […]

Documenting Design Discovery

In this week’s article Dan Brown tells us about discovery’s six assertions, as well as gives us great tips for creating discovery documents. Here’s an excerpt from the article: Thinking about discovery outcomes in terms of assertions focuses on the point of the artifacts you’re making. A wireframe represents the structure of a page or screen, […]