Archive for the 'Design Process' topic

Help Designers and Developers Learn to Understand Each Other

The notion of being a “designer who can code” has been a prevalent topic in recent years. One of the greatest benefits of using CSS is speaking the same language as your developers. Having this common language aids in creating a more collaborative feel to conversations with developers versus dictating to them what to do. Being […]

Erika Hall – Cultivating Shared Understanding from Collaborative User Research

Traditionally, user research has taken on more of a scientific identity. You would do usability testing and research, take a ton of notes, and then compile all of your findings into a report. The effectiveness of that research depended on whether anyone read the report, and then if they could do anything actionable with that data.

Nathan Curtis – Building Scalable Design Systems and Style Guides

The expansion of the web past a desktop-based world into more of a multi-device ecosystem has caused organizations to re-evaluate almost everything they do. Style guides have had to grow to accommodate this new reality of multiple screens sizes and resolutions. When you start incorporating the multitude of products across devices and all the people working on them, organizations are forced to think more “systematically.”

Jenn Lukas – Developing a Living Style Guide with CSS

The notion of being a “designer who can code” has been a prevalent topic in recent years. Delivering static PDFs and working in photoshop is seen as inefficient in some circles. Being able to create a clickable or even responsive mockup to present to developers and stakeholders can be a better way to show your intent. It’s also much easier to iterate by changing a few lines of code.

Kim Goodwin – Using Scenarios to Solve Problems

Understanding is what user experience as a field hinges upon. After all if you don’t understand how users are interacting with your product or service, you don’t know what to design for. But how, as a team, do you come to that understanding? Telling the story of a user’s journey highlights areas where you’re right on point and where you’re missing the mark.

Marc Stickdorn – Service Design: Creating Delightful Cross-Channel Experiences

Service design seems to go by an increasing array of names: Customer Experience, Cross-Channel UX, or even just “design thinking.” In most cases, these terms describe a holistic approach to your users’ and customers’ needs, no matter where or when they’re interacting with your product or service. In traditionally siloed organizations, it can be no small task to ensure that you are providing the best possible service.

Snag Your Designer’s Toolkit by August 20 with Your UI20 Registration

The User Interface 20 Conference happens in Boston this November and dives deep into important UX topics. You’ll also get a special designer’s toolkit when you register by August 20. Get Your Free Designer’s Toolkit Iterate and share your thoughts in physical form with your team. Capture all your awesome ideas during and after the conference. Avoid the time drain […]

A UX Advantage Podcast with Karen McGrane: Shifting To Continuous Deployment

The speed of Agile delivery fundamentally changes the work process and puts new demands on the design cycle. What happens when the notion of deadline dates is replaced with a continual stream of experience enhancements by everyone in the organization?

Steph Hay – Designing with a Content-First Approach

Usability in products and websites is what most organizations strive for. The more usable the product, the more likely that people will use it. Through research and testing, you can root out many issues with clunky interactions that hinder the experience. What isn’t as immediately clear is if some perceived usability issues are actually understandability problems. Your content could be the culprit.

Jeff Gothelf – Discover What Customers Really Want with Lean UX

When some people hear the term Lean UX, they dismiss it as simply a nouveau buzzword. There can be some confusion as to its relationship to Agile, both the methodology and the adjective. Some of the biggest resistance came from the idea that Lean UX was shortcutting and lazily undoing much of the groundwork to get organizations to buy into the value of UX. But as waterfall development increasingly becomes “the old way” of doing things, teams are operating in more agile, or Lean, ways.