Archive for the 'Design Process' topic

Stop the Feature-Checklist War with Your Products

Engaging in user research can tell you how your customers use your product but more importantly why they use it a particular way. If the users of your product are requesting what seems to be a simple fix, such as moving a button, perhaps there are greater underlying reasons. So rather than just accepting the request […]

UIE Article: Content and Design Are Inseparable Work Partners

It’s not uncommon within organizations that web site content is treated differently and separately from the web site design process. Yet the users do not separate the two and see it as one experience. When the content and design process are not done hand-in-hand, poor user experiences is often the result. Today we re-print an […]

How Are You Getting Your Team on the Same Page?

While developing the topics and workshop leaders for this year’s User Interface 20 Conference in Boston, November 2–4, I realized that a general theme was emerging—getting everyone on the same page about your designs. Here’s how each workshop at UI20 contributes to this theme: Marc Stickdorn’s workshop on Service Design: Creating Delightful Cross-Channel Experiences is about […]

Aligning Your Team with Design Systems and Style Guides

Nathan Curtis, co-founder of EightShapes, has worked with component libraries and style guides for years. He says that when you’re thinking about all the platforms that comprise the totality of an experience, these patterns (such as a sign-in form, or elements like buttons) need to be more broadly applicable. It’s one thing to create the […]

It All Comes down to Aligning Your Organization

If you don’t understand how users are interacting with your product or service, you don’t know what to design for. But how, as a team, do you come to that understanding? Telling the story of a user’s journey highlights areas where you’re right on point and where you’re missing the mark. And it’s a great […]

Help Designers and Developers Learn to Understand Each Other

The notion of being a “designer who can code” has been a prevalent topic in recent years. One of the greatest benefits of using CSS is speaking the same language as your developers. Having this common language aids in creating a more collaborative feel to conversations with developers versus dictating to them what to do. Being […]

Erika Hall – Cultivating Shared Understanding from Collaborative User Research

Traditionally, user research has taken on more of a scientific identity. You would do usability testing and research, take a ton of notes, and then compile all of your findings into a report. The effectiveness of that research depended on whether anyone read the report, and then if they could do anything actionable with that data.

Nathan Curtis – Building Scalable Design Systems and Style Guides

The expansion of the web past a desktop-based world into more of a multi-device ecosystem has caused organizations to re-evaluate almost everything they do. Style guides have had to grow to accommodate this new reality of multiple screens sizes and resolutions. When you start incorporating the multitude of products across devices and all the people working on them, organizations are forced to think more “systematically.”

Jenn Lukas – Developing a Living Style Guide with CSS

The notion of being a “designer who can code” has been a prevalent topic in recent years. Delivering static PDFs and working in photoshop is seen as inefficient in some circles. Being able to create a clickable or even responsive mockup to present to developers and stakeholders can be a better way to show your intent. It’s also much easier to iterate by changing a few lines of code.

Kim Goodwin – Using Scenarios to Solve Problems

Understanding is what user experience as a field hinges upon. After all if you don’t understand how users are interacting with your product or service, you don’t know what to design for. But how, as a team, do you come to that understanding? Telling the story of a user’s journey highlights areas where you’re right on point and where you’re missing the mark.