Archive for the 'Information Architecture' topic

UIEtips: Incorporating Content Strategy into Your Information Architecture

In this week’s UIEtips, Margot Bloomstein shares examples of how organizations are successfully incorporating content strategy into their information architecture. Here’s an excerpt from the article: What’s in, and what’s out? “In my experience, it is very easy for brilliant information architects (or UX people who do information architecture) to underestimate the importance of editorial […]

Des Traynor – Strengthening Your Design through Microcopy

Des Traynor is an expert on crafting microcopy. In his virtual seminar, Microcopy That Strengthens your Design’s Experience, Des identifies the key questions to ask when creating microcopy so that it doesn’t get lost or created by accident. The audience asked a bunch of great questions during the live seminar and Des joins Adam Churchill to answer some questions in this podcast.

Chris Risdon – Mapping Your Customer’s Journey

With so many teams and divisions within organizations, falling into a pattern of designing within your own silo is incredibly easy. Mobile teams are focused on the mobile products. Desktop teams are concerned with the desktop experience. But customers interact with your product or service from an increasing variety of touchpoints. They expect a seamless experience across channels and devices, but this is often not the case.

Rhythm and Flow – A 2012 IA Summit Podcast with Peter Stahl

Most interactions have an underlying rhythm. For example, an application may ask you to scan a list of items, then click one, leading to another list to scan and click. Scan, click, scan, click. You can get into a groove. Systems increasingly have rhythm too: animated transitions, hover responses, and digital physics. Static is so last year.

Driving a Multichannel Experience from a Single Message – A 2012 IA Summit Podcast with Margot Bloomstein

E pluribus unum? Better yet, out of one, create many—many channels within a multifaceted but unified experience. That’s the challenge of experience design among constrained budgets, tight timelines, and unlimited interaction expectations. Content strategy’s communication foundation, the message architecture, can help you answer that challenge.

Beyond Channels: Context Is King – A 2012 IA Summit Podcast with Emily Wengert

When smartphones and tablets first emerged, designers focused on channel differences like screen size in order to understand the basics in this new area. It’s time to set aside channel-centric planning and think of a user’s context first.

What’s Your Perception Strategy? (Why It’s NOT All About Content) – A 2012 IA Summit Podcast with Stephen P. Anderson

If we focus too much on content, we ignore what we know about how our associative brain comes to makes sense new information. Think about how many people respond before reading past the first sentence of an email, or how a magazine article doesn’t get the same reaction when displayed in HTML. Or consider how knowing the author of a publication influences your judgement of that content.

The IA Summit: Where UX Experts Emerge

Every year, I go to 40 different conferences to hunt for the smartest, best UX presentations for our own conferences and virtual seminars. The IA Summit is, by far, the conference for which I’ve discovered the most talented of our presenters over the years. It was at the IA Summit that I first saw Luke […]

Chris Risdon – Mapping the User Experience

In the current multi-device, interconnected landscape, a user can interact with your product or service from a variety of touchpoints. At each, you must address the user’s needs at a particular place and time. Those needs will be determined by where they are in the experience.

Seth Earley – SharePoint and the User Experience

SharePoint is a powerful tool, but the complexity associated with it can leave users overwhelmed. Users trying to manage content and share information through SharePoint often experience frustration. Seeing where UX fits within SharePoint isn’t always clear.