Archive for the 'UX' topic

Stop Doing Survey Research

Recently, Erika Hall published the article On Surveys where she emphasized the danger of using surveys as a research tool. She suggested that they’re often misunderstood and misused and frequently poorly done. Here’s an excerpt from her article: In my opinion it’s much much harder to write a good survey than to conduct good qualitative user research. […]

What’s the Minimum Viable Product to Design for Success?

Lean UX focuses on research and the minimum viable product. Getting your product in front of customers early in the process lets you test any hypotheses you have about both the product and your customer base. Uncovering misconceptions up front allows you to iterate and pivot to arrive not just at the best design, but […]

Erika Hall – Cultivating Shared Understanding from Collaborative User Research

Traditionally, user research has taken on more of a scientific identity. You would do usability testing and research, take a ton of notes, and then compile all of your findings into a report. The effectiveness of that research depended on whether anyone read the report, and then if they could do anything actionable with that data.

Nathan Curtis – Building Scalable Design Systems and Style Guides

The expansion of the web past a desktop-based world into more of a multi-device ecosystem has caused organizations to re-evaluate almost everything they do. Style guides have had to grow to accommodate this new reality of multiple screens sizes and resolutions. When you start incorporating the multitude of products across devices and all the people working on them, organizations are forced to think more “systematically.”

Hiring for Building UX Teams – Kim Goodwin’s September 17 Virtual Seminar

Convincing an organization to invest in growing a UX team is an achievement worth celebrating! Once the glow of that success fades, though, most leaders realize that hiring for an effective UX team is incredibly difficult. In Finding the Perfect Fit: Hiring for Building (and Joining) UX Teams, Kim Goodwin teaches you how to build successful agency and […]

Jenn Lukas – Developing a Living Style Guide with CSS

The notion of being a “designer who can code” has been a prevalent topic in recent years. Delivering static PDFs and working in photoshop is seen as inefficient in some circles. Being able to create a clickable or even responsive mockup to present to developers and stakeholders can be a better way to show your intent. It’s also much easier to iterate by changing a few lines of code.

UI20: Convince Your Boss

You know it’s worth coming to UI20, but does your boss? Use this information and a summary of costs to help you get the green light. Five Overall Benefits: Get the latest UX techniques. Network and learn what others are doing in the UX field. Improve individual and team design skills. Solve current design problems. Eliminate the need to hire outside […]

Kim Goodwin – Using Scenarios to Solve Problems

Understanding is what user experience as a field hinges upon. After all if you don’t understand how users are interacting with your product or service, you don’t know what to design for. But how, as a team, do you come to that understanding? Telling the story of a user’s journey highlights areas where you’re right on point and where you’re missing the mark.

Marc Stickdorn – Service Design: Creating Delightful Cross-Channel Experiences

Service design seems to go by an increasing array of names: Customer Experience, Cross-Channel UX, or even just “design thinking.” In most cases, these terms describe a holistic approach to your users’ and customers’ needs, no matter where or when they’re interacting with your product or service. In traditionally siloed organizations, it can be no small task to ensure that you are providing the best possible service.

A UX Advantage Podcast with Karen McGrane: Shifting To Continuous Deployment

The speed of Agile delivery fundamentally changes the work process and puts new demands on the design cycle. What happens when the notion of deadline dates is replaced with a continual stream of experience enhancements by everyone in the organization?